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Global Climate Change

"Ocean In Focus" Photography Contest to Advance Ocean Conservation: Finalists Announced

SeaWeb, an international non-profit ocean conservation organization, announced the six finalists of the Marine Photobank’s fifth annual “Ocean In Focus” photography contest on 12 March 2013. The contest aims to illuminate the human-ocean connection and advance ocean conservation through photography.


Book “Water Ethics” Calls for Use of Practical Wisdom from Different Cultures to Address Water Crisis

Peter Brown and Jeremy Schmidt’s book “Water Ethics” proposes “…that we will need to think about water ecologically—as something that binds us together in a shared and interdependent world—and which we must all steward together,” and “… for that the practical wisdom accrued through centuries of different cultural approaches to water management should form the basis for ecologically sound water sharing practices.”

 


NASA Satellites Find Freshwater Losses in Middle East

A new study using data from a pair of gravity-measuring NASA satellites finds that large parts of the arid Middle East region lost freshwater reserves rapidly during the past decade.


Sainsbury’s Supermarkets Install 69,500 Photovoltaic Solar Panels To Generate 16 Megawatts (MW) of Power

Sainsbury's has installed 69,500 new photovoltaic solar panels, or 16 MW of power, across 169 stores in the UK.  The significant investment means collectively Sainsbury's supermarkets currently host the largest solar array in the UK and Europe. The solar power will reduce Sainsbury's total CO2 emissions by an estimated 6,800 tonnes per year, and each store's energy consumption as well as delivering energy cost savings.

 


Scientists Discover New Trigger for Immense North Atlantic Plankton Bloom

The newly discovered mechanism triggering the blooming of countless microscopic plant plankton, or phytoplankton, in the North Atlantic helps explain the timing of the spring and summer bloom, known to mariners and fishers for centuries and clearly visible in satellite images. 

 


Study on Fungi Evolution Answers Questions About Ancient Coal Formation and May Help Advance Future Biofuels Production

 

Study Reveals the Potentially Large Influences of Fungi, One of the Most Biologically Diverse Classes of Organisms, On Our Energy Supplies

A new study which includes the first large-scale comparison of fungi that cause rot decay suggests that the evolution of a type of fungi known as white rot may have brought an end to a 60-million-year-long period of coal deposition known as the Carboniferous period. Coal deposits that accumulated during the Carboniferous, which ended about 300 million years ago, have historically fueled about 50 percent of U.S. electric power generation.

 


New Countries Phase-In Efficient Lighting to Yield Major Economic and Climate Benefits

A total of five percent of global electricity consumption could be saved every year through a transition to efficient lighting, resulting in annual worldwide savings of over US$ 110 billion. These are among the main findings of 150 country lighting assessments and a new global policy map on efficient lighting.  An en.lighten press conference at Rio +20 highlighted the planned phase-out of inefficient lighting which is designed to deliver major economic and climate benefits by 2016.

 

 


Cook+Fox Architects Create Buildings Designed to Restore, Regenerate, and Contribute To The Urban Environment

 

Cook+Fox Architects are finding ways to achieve their vision of integrated, environmentally responsive design inspired by concepts such as Biophilia. They not only incorporate Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) criteria, but seek to go beyond those standards as they design to restore, regenerate, and contribute to the urban environment.  

 


Learning from Earth’s History about Changing the Chemistry of the Atmosphere and Oceans

The oceans may be acidifying faster today than they did in the last 300 million years, according to scientists who published a paper in the March 2, 2012 issue of the journal Science. "These scientists have synthesized and evaluated evidence far back in Earth's history," said Candace Major, program officer in the National Science Foundation's (NSF) Division of Ocean Sciences, which funded the research. "The ocean acidification we're seeing today is unprecedented…a result of the very fast rates at which we're changing the chemistry of the atmosphere and oceans."

 


National Renewable Energy Laboratory Aims to Slash Cost of Solar Cells

Solar-powered electricity prices could soon approach those of power from coal or natural gas thanks to collaborative research with solar start-up Ampulse Corporation at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) ) National Renewable Energy Laboratory  (NREL).

 


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