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Biodiversity

World’s Largest Shark Sanctuary Declared in Central Pacific

The Republic of the Marshall Islands is now home to the world’s largest shark sanctuary. The Nitijela, the Marshallese parliament, unanimously passed legislation last week  that ends commercial fishing of sharks in all 1,990,530 square kilometers (768,547 square miles) of the central Pacific country’s waters, an ocean area four times the landmass of California.


Over 1,000 Species Newly Discovered In New Guinea

Final Frontier: Newly Discovered species of New Guinea (1998 – 2008), a WWF study reports that 1,060 new species have been discovered the island of New Guinea from 1998 to 2008.


Conservation Without Borders: IUCN and German Federal Agency for Nature Conservation Highlight European Examples of Transboundary Conservation

Conservation action involving several countries brings large scale benefits to nature and helps resolve social and political conflicts, a new IUCN (International Union for Conservation of Nature) publication shows.


Tropical Birds Return to Harvested Rainforest Areas in Brazil: Bird species thought extinct came back to the forests

Bird species in rainforest fragments in Brazil that were isolated by deforestation disappeared then reappeared over a quarter-century, according to research results published on June 22, 2011 in the journal PLoS (Public Library of Science) ONE.  

 


Thousands of Hectares of Tropical Forest are Saved

Thousands of hectares of tropical dry forests in the Brazilian state of Minas Gerais are now safe from logging, thanks to scientists affiliated with a project called Tropi-Dry.


Scientists Determine What Makes an Orangutan an Orangutan

For the first time, scientists have mapped the genome--the genetic code--of orangutans. This new tool may be used to support efforts to maintain the genetic diversity of captive and wild orangutans.


Sea Turtles: "Turtle Positioning System" helps reptiles on fantastic voyage

"Turtle Positioning System" helps reptiles on fantastic voyage


TEEB Report Puts World’s Natural Assets on the Global Political Radar

The economic importance of the world's natural assets is now firmly on the political radar as a result of an international assessment showcasing the enormous economic value of forests, freshwater, soils and coral reefs, as well as the social and economic costs of their loss, was the conclusion of The Economics of Ecosystems and Biodiversity (TEEB) report launched on October 20, 2010 by TEEB study leader, Pavan Sukhdev.


Ground Rules for Sharing Benefits of World’s Wealth of Genetic Resources Laid Out in New Treaty

After close to 20 years of discussion and debate, Governments from across the globe today agreed to a new treaty to manage the world’s economically-central genetic resources in a far fairer and more systematic way.


International Efforts Save Dugongs

Dugongs are believed to have been at the origin of mermaid legends when spotted swimming in the water from a distance. Now the remaining populations of this seemingly clumsy sea mammal, commonly known as a sea cow, are at serious risk of becoming extinct within the next 40 years.


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